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CONSEQUENCES AND SYMPTOMS OF INSOMNIA

Increased Errors or Accidents Difficulty Falling Asleep at Night Impulsiveness or Aggression Waking up during the Night Daytime Tiredness or Sleepiness Irritability, Depression or Anxiety
Increased Errors or Accidents Difficulty Falling Asleep at Night Impulsiveness or Aggression Waking up during the Night Daytime Tiredness or Sleepiness Irritability, Depression or Anxiety

AN EPISODE OF INSOMNIA





Insomnia can occur at any age and is more likely to affect women than men. According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), people with certain risk factors are more likely to have insomnia.

Certain medical conditions, such as obesity and cardiovascular disease, can also lead to insomnia. Menopause can lead to insomnia as well.

Those with insomnia can have daily struggles with simple tasks such as focusing and paying attention, which can lead to a decrease in work performance. There have been several instances where workers with insomnia were involved or have caused accidents due to their lack of awareness.

Insomnia has also been linked as a symptom to several mental illnesses. According to the several published studies, more than 50% of the insomnia cases are linked to anxiety, depression, or other psychological stresses. For example, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder are both associated with difficulty falling asleep.


Here is some additional information on how untreated insomnia, or not getting restful sleep, can contribute to other health consequences:

  • Weight Gain
    • Too little sleep may disrupt the balance of hormones that regulate hunger and appetite and increase the risk of weight gain. Researchers found that sleep deprivation in healthy adults caused an increase in a hormone responsible for feelings of hunger and a decrease in a hormone that suppresses hunger.
  • Depression
    • The relationship between sleep and depression is complex. Recent research has indicated that depressive symptoms may decrease once insomnia has been effectively treated and sufficient sleep restored.
  • Immune System
    • Without sufficient sleep, your body makes fewer proteins that can target inflammation and infection, effectively creating an immune response. These proteins called cytokines are produced and released during sleep.
  • Diabetes
    • Insufficient sleep is linked to an increased risk for the development of T2D. Sleep duration and quality have emerged as predictors of levels of Hemoglobin A1c, an important marker of blood sugar control. This suggests that optimizing sleep duration and quality may be an important means of improving blood sugar control in persons with T2D.
  • Cardiovascular Disease
    • Persons with sleep apnea have been found to be at an increased risk for a number of cardiovascular diseases. Such diseases as hypertension, stroke, coronary heart disease and irregular heartbeats have been found to be more common among those with disordered sleep than their peers without sleep abnormalities.
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Speak to your doctor SPEAK TO YOUR DOCTOR IF INSOMNIA MAY INTERFERE WITH YOUR LIFE.